Posts Tagged ‘higher ed’

Ranking Colleges the Moneyball Way

Inside Higher Ed‘s Ryan Craig recently penned an article about implementing the same principles the Oakland A’s general manager, Billy Beane, used to form a better baseball team on, ahem, valuing colleges. It’s called Moneyball, or in this case, Moneycollege.

The concept of  ”moneyball” was that Beane hired and fired his players based on statistics that, although reliable, were generally being ignored by the Old Boys’ Club in favor of less reliable facts and mere opinions.

So how does this relate to college?

Well, Craig argues that just like baseball in the recent past, higher educations focuses on “what’s easy to measure.” In baseball, values of players were assigned based on many superficial “numbers”–height, physique, age, speed of pitches, you know, all the pretty things in life. In higher education, Craig says we’re basically focusing on the equivalent to what they were wrongly concentrating on in baseball: research, rankings and real estate. These are all countable measurements and easily comparable. But unfortunately, those don’t even come close to the measurements that should be taken into account like, uh,  student learning and student outcomes. Duh. Aren’t you curious to know how your college ranks in getting its students hired and happy and healthy following college graduation?

While so many schools are pouring energy into these antiquated measurements, like how many big buildings they have or how much research their faculty can produce in the smallest about of time, they are ignoring what is actually occurring in the academic landscape. States are cutting their budgets, people are afraid to go into debt for an education they’re afraid isn’t worth the reward, and more and more people are taking their education online.

Just like Billy Beane was struggling with a paltry budget to create a World Series-winning team, colleges with small budgets are in the same boat. How can they compete in this game of rankings if they don’t have the research, rankings and real state of colleges with bigger budgets? Well, maybe in the future they’ll be able to beat the system by playing moneycollege. If they can gather the data showing the right stats–students on-base percentage, or in academic terms,  student success rate, who knows how the higher ed game can change.

Which college statistics are most important to you?

14 Colleges Most Likely to Lead to Our Future Politicians

Sure, we’ve all had that childhood dream of being President of the United States, but after that stint as secretary of [fill in your high school's name]‘s student council, you’ve realized the reality of public office is far too big a burden to continue after this year’s prom streamers are up.

So who in their right minds actually want to take on the crazy responsibility and bear the weight of so much public scrutiny? The Daily Beast recently published a list of the colleges and universities with the most significant precedence for turning their students into great (or at least assist in further instilling the delusions of greatness) leaders of state and country.

Here are the top 14 colleges and universities most likely to “create” our future politicians:

Can you guess which U.S. presidents came from each university?

1. Harvard University
Presidents: 8
State Senators: 12
State Representatives: 21

2. Yale University
Presidents: 5
State Senators: 9
State Representatives: 9

3. Georgetown University
Presidents: 2
State Senators: 6
State Representatives: 11

4. Stanford University
Presidents: 3
State Senators: 6
State Representatives: 7

5. UCLA
Presidents: 0
State Senators: 1
State Representatives: 12

6. University of Texas at Austin
Presidents: 0
State Senators: 1
State Representatives: 11

7. University of Michigan
Presidents: 1
State Senators: 1
State Representatives: 9

8. University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Presidents: 1
State Senators: 0
State Representatives: 10

9. George Washington University
Presidents: 0
State Senators: 5
State Representatives: 5

10. Columbia University
Presidents: 3
State Senators: 1
State Representatives: 5

11. United State Military Academy
Presidents: 2
State Senators: 2
State Representatives: 5

12. University of Georgia
Presidents: 0
State Senators: 2
State Representatives: 7

13. Princeton University
Presidents: 2
State Senators: 1
State Representatives: 5

14. Duke University
Presidents: 1
State Senators: 1
State Representatives: 6

Can you name a president, state senator, state representative from one of these schools? Leave a comment below!

The 10 Most Expensive Private Colleges

scholarshipsIllustrationIconLast week we gave you the list of the ten least expensive private schools. Today, from US News, we bring you the 10 most expensive private colleges.

Before you take a looksy and get all choked up because your dream school costs $40,000 a year, remember that doesn’t mean you can’t apply for merit aid and scholarships to lower that price by whole lot.

Without any further delay, here are the top 10 most expensive private colleges:

1. Connecticut College
Tuition and fees 2010-2011: $43,990
Cool fact: Chartered in 1911, the founding of the college was a response to Wesleyan University’s decision to stop admitting women.

2. Columbia University
Tuition and fees 2010-2011: $43,304
Cool fact: Columbia is the oldest university of higher learning in the state of New York.

3. Vassar College
Tuition and fees: $43,190
Cool fact: Vassar has a student organization called The Barefoot Monkeys, which is aCircus Arts, Firespinning, and Juggling Club. You will not only be paying for a multidisciplinary education, but also some old school entertainment.

4. St. John’s College (MD)
Tuition and fees:
$42,592
Cool fact: Founded originally in 1696 as a preparatory school, it received a collegiate charter in 1784, making it one of the oldest colleges in the United States.

5. Trinity College
Tuition and fees: $42,420
Cool fact: Trinity has a student to faculty ratio of 10:1.

6. Bucknell University
Tuition and fees: $42,342
Cool fact: The sixth president of the university, David Jayne Hill, had an epic mustache.

7. St. John’s College (NM)
Tuition and fees:
$42,192
Cool fact: Both St. John’s College campuses are known for their Great Books Program where student-led discussion is the basis for most classes and teachers take a non-directive role.

8. Wesleyan University
Tuition and fees:
$42,084
Cool fact: Wesleyan offers a BA/MA Program in the sciences leading to a Bachelor’s degree in the fourth year and a Master’s degree in the fifth year. Tuition for the fifth year of the Master’s degree is waived.

9. Bard College at Simon’s Rock
Tuition and fees:
$41,990
Cool fact: Simon’s Rock is an “early college”, designed for students to enroll immediately after completing the tenth or eleventh grade, rather than after graduating from high school.

10. Carnegie Mellon University
Tuition and fees:
$41,940
Cool fact: John Forbes Nash, the subject of A Beautiful Mind and winner of the 1994 Noble Prize in Economics, was a 1948 graduate.

How much does tuition price affect your college decision? Leave a comment!