Posts Tagged ‘college universities’

What Type of Student Goes to an Urban College or University?

Categories: Admissions Advice

campus

When it comes to filling out whichever college questionnaire you happen to be filling out today, the bubble that designates whether you want to go to an “urban” college or a “rural/suburban” one always gets you. It’s not like you’ve experienced going to college while living in a big city yet or lived at small college who’s campus literally is the city. How would you know the difference? How do you know if you’re a city college kid or a more traditional campus kinda kid?

Don’t fret. You’re not alone–people have been wondering the same question for ages. And now, an excerpt from the best selling 44 BC tablet “Shall I Go to an Urban College or Suburban One?”:

“Volo ut peto a urbs universitas.”
“Non a rusticus universitas?”
“Ego sum inconditus. Quis should ego operor?”
“Insisto vestri pectus pectoris!!!!”

The age old question is difficult to answer. So, today we’re attacking the urban side of the argument and putting forward some qualities of a student who might be more inclined to attend a city college. Here we go…

Q: What Type of Student Goes to an Urban College or University?

A: A student who…

Wants the activity of a city
College life is exciting, but add the element of a big city like Chicago, New York, Boston, etc., and you’ve got endless things to do. Go to class, and then go to the opening of a new restaurant. Finish studying for a final and then go be an extra in a movie filming down the street. If having a cornucopia of things to do in your free time appeals to you, city living during your college years might be right for you.

Wants the work and internship opportunities available in a big city
One of the unique things about going to an urban college means you’ll have more opportunities to work at jobs or internships that are only offered in a big city. If you’re living in New York, you could accept an internship at Rockefeller Center and continue going to school. A student at a college in prairie-ville Kansas–no matter how great a school it is–can’t take on the same opportunity without leaving their college.

Wants easy access to public transportation
Not keen on driving? While you’ll find that most college campuses, urban or suburban, are livable without having a car, in the city, you can travel further and swifter just using public transportation. No need to pay for gas or borrow a car to get to Ikea–just a subway, bus, bus, subway and you’re there!

Loves a certain city
Have you ever dreamt of living in a certain city? Your college years are a great time to actually get up and move there and experience living in the city of your dreams.

Wants the cultural diversity of a larger city
Most any college is a haven for arts and culture. But, a big city is itself a place to experience arts and culture in motion. From beautiful museums and galleries to ethnic neighborhoods and flee markets, a large city has lot of big and small cultural tidbits to offer.

What’s your opinion on going to an urban college? Leave a comment.

The 10 Most Expensive Private Colleges

scholarshipsIllustrationIconLast week we gave you the list of the ten least expensive private schools. Today, from US News, we bring you the 10 most expensive private colleges.

Before you take a looksy and get all choked up because your dream school costs $40,000 a year, remember that doesn’t mean you can’t apply for merit aid and scholarships to lower that price by whole lot.

Without any further delay, here are the top 10 most expensive private colleges:

1. Connecticut College
Tuition and fees 2010-2011: $43,990
Cool fact: Chartered in 1911, the founding of the college was a response to Wesleyan University’s decision to stop admitting women.

2. Columbia University
Tuition and fees 2010-2011: $43,304
Cool fact: Columbia is the oldest university of higher learning in the state of New York.

3. Vassar College
Tuition and fees: $43,190
Cool fact: Vassar has a student organization called The Barefoot Monkeys, which is aCircus Arts, Firespinning, and Juggling Club. You will not only be paying for a multidisciplinary education, but also some old school entertainment.

4. St. John’s College (MD)
Tuition and fees:
$42,592
Cool fact: Founded originally in 1696 as a preparatory school, it received a collegiate charter in 1784, making it one of the oldest colleges in the United States.

5. Trinity College
Tuition and fees: $42,420
Cool fact: Trinity has a student to faculty ratio of 10:1.

6. Bucknell University
Tuition and fees: $42,342
Cool fact: The sixth president of the university, David Jayne Hill, had an epic mustache.

7. St. John’s College (NM)
Tuition and fees:
$42,192
Cool fact: Both St. John’s College campuses are known for their Great Books Program where student-led discussion is the basis for most classes and teachers take a non-directive role.

8. Wesleyan University
Tuition and fees:
$42,084
Cool fact: Wesleyan offers a BA/MA Program in the sciences leading to a Bachelor’s degree in the fourth year and a Master’s degree in the fifth year. Tuition for the fifth year of the Master’s degree is waived.

9. Bard College at Simon’s Rock
Tuition and fees:
$41,990
Cool fact: Simon’s Rock is an “early college”, designed for students to enroll immediately after completing the tenth or eleventh grade, rather than after graduating from high school.

10. Carnegie Mellon University
Tuition and fees:
$41,940
Cool fact: John Forbes Nash, the subject of A Beautiful Mind and winner of the 1994 Noble Prize in Economics, was a 1948 graduate.

How much does tuition price affect your college decision? Leave a comment!

Traditional Language Programs in Universities Have Declined Steadily Over Decades

Bonjour! Hola! Ciao!

Spanish ClassFewer and fewer undergraduate students are saying “Hello” to the Romanic Language majors.  According to The Chronicle of Higher Education college undergraduate majors in German and the Romance languages have been vanishing from American higher-education:

In the 1970-71 academic year, Romance-language majors were offered by close to 76 percent of American four-year colleges. But by 2005-6, only about 59 percent offered them. German programs saw a similar decline: In 1970-71, about 44 percent of colleges offered the major, but in 2005-6, just under 27 percent did so. Leaving aside “secretarial science,” those are by far the largest relative declines discovered by the Riverside scholars.

Would you ever study the romantic languages?

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