Posts Tagged ‘college degree’

10 Largest Colleges in the U.S.

campusWhen deciding on a college, college-bound students have a cornucopia of factors to pick and choose from–the programs it offers, the location, the professors, the campus, the sports–there are just so many elements!

One of the most important factors that often gets overlooked, or is just misunderstood like your 8th grade goth self, is school size.  The size of an enrollment class completely changes the culture of a school. Going to a university with 300 people in your freshman class is far different from going to a college with 10,000 people in your class. So if you’re looking for that big school atmosphere, today, we’re giving you a list of the ten universities with the largest undergraduate enrollment:

1. University of Central Florida
Enrollment – 45,398
Fun fact – UCF was founded with the goal to educate current and future students for promising space-age careers in engineering, electronics and other technological professions, thus serving as a support system for the nearby Kennedy Space Center. 3….2…..1…take off!

2. Ohio State University
Enrollment - 41,348
Fun fact - OSU was among the first group of public universities to raise a $1 billion endowment in 1999.

3. Arizona State University
Enrollment - 41, 256
Fun fact -To ensure college access to all Arizona residents, ASU has relatively liberal admission standards. Admission is ensured to Arizona residents in the top 25% of their high-school class with at a weighted secondary GPA of 2.5 GPA, or anyone with 24 credits of community college work with a 2.0 GPA minimum.

4. Rutgers University
Enrollment - 38,902
Fun fact – Rutgers is one of the nine Colonial colleges founded before the American Revolution. “Education is coming; education is coming!” – Paul Revere’s cousin.

5. Texas A&M University
Enrollment – 38,810
Fun fact -Texas A&M’s original mission was to educate males in farming and military technique. Because everybody knows, if you can plant a seed, you can grow an army.

6. Pennsylvania State University
Enrollment – 38,630
Fun fact – The 22,000+ student section at home football games is the largest concentrated student section in the nation…which is either a dream come true or your biggest headache.

7. University of Texas at Austin
Enrollment – 38,168
Fun fact - To show your UT pride, just show the Hook’em Horns hand signal to show you’re a Texas Longhorn. Make sure not to show it off in the wrong neighborhood though.

8. University of South Florida
Enrollment – 36,595
Fun fact – USF is also one of the nation’s top centers for the advancement in research of treatments for Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, and Huntington’s disease.

9. Michigan State University
Enrollment – 36,389
Fun fact - East Lansing is pretty much all college town, with 60.2% of the population between the ages of 15 and 24

10. University of Florida
Enrollment – 33,628
Fun fact - Approximately 5,200 undergraduate students (or approximately 15%) are members of either a sorority or fraternity.

What’s your take? Is a big school right for you? Leave a comment!

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The 10 Most Expensive Private Colleges

scholarshipsIllustrationIconLast week we gave you the list of the ten least expensive private schools. Today, from US News, we bring you the 10 most expensive private colleges.

Before you take a looksy and get all choked up because your dream school costs $40,000 a year, remember that doesn’t mean you can’t apply for merit aid and scholarships to lower that price by whole lot.

Without any further delay, here are the top 10 most expensive private colleges:

1. Connecticut College
Tuition and fees 2010-2011: $43,990
Cool fact: Chartered in 1911, the founding of the college was a response to Wesleyan University’s decision to stop admitting women.

2. Columbia University
Tuition and fees 2010-2011: $43,304
Cool fact: Columbia is the oldest university of higher learning in the state of New York.

3. Vassar College
Tuition and fees: $43,190
Cool fact: Vassar has a student organization called The Barefoot Monkeys, which is aCircus Arts, Firespinning, and Juggling Club. You will not only be paying for a multidisciplinary education, but also some old school entertainment.

4. St. John’s College (MD)
Tuition and fees:
$42,592
Cool fact: Founded originally in 1696 as a preparatory school, it received a collegiate charter in 1784, making it one of the oldest colleges in the United States.

5. Trinity College
Tuition and fees: $42,420
Cool fact: Trinity has a student to faculty ratio of 10:1.

6. Bucknell University
Tuition and fees: $42,342
Cool fact: The sixth president of the university, David Jayne Hill, had an epic mustache.

7. St. John’s College (NM)
Tuition and fees:
$42,192
Cool fact: Both St. John’s College campuses are known for their Great Books Program where student-led discussion is the basis for most classes and teachers take a non-directive role.

8. Wesleyan University
Tuition and fees:
$42,084
Cool fact: Wesleyan offers a BA/MA Program in the sciences leading to a Bachelor’s degree in the fourth year and a Master’s degree in the fifth year. Tuition for the fifth year of the Master’s degree is waived.

9. Bard College at Simon’s Rock
Tuition and fees:
$41,990
Cool fact: Simon’s Rock is an “early college”, designed for students to enroll immediately after completing the tenth or eleventh grade, rather than after graduating from high school.

10. Carnegie Mellon University
Tuition and fees:
$41,940
Cool fact: John Forbes Nash, the subject of A Beautiful Mind and winner of the 1994 Noble Prize in Economics, was a 1948 graduate.

How much does tuition price affect your college decision? Leave a comment!

4 Ways to Transition from High School to College

Categories: College Life

abcWe know we’re preaching to the choir if we tell you that college is way different from high school.  You’ve heard it a million times before: college means freedom, expanding your world-view, and most of all, time-management.  Before you eject yourself out of your seat so you don’t have to hear another cliché piece of information about college, the following 4 pieces of advice are things that have actually come as surprises to incoming freshman.

So, here are 54ways to transition from high school to college:

1.  Check in with your advisor every semester
In high school, it’s pretty clear what classes you have to take to graduate, and somebody’s more or less holding your hand along the way–and no we’re not talking about your homecoming date.  Whether or not your high school sweetheart heads to the same college as you, you have to take your graduation requirements into your own hands.  Too many college students coast through 4 years of school, assuming they’re on track to graduate and are unfortunately road blocked when they learn they never took that quantitative reasoning class they needed to graduate. How can one circumvent this? Meet once a semester with your advisor to make sure you’re on track. Requirements can get tricky and you want to make sure you fill them. Otherwise, it can cost you more time and worse, more money.

2. Find study buddies
Since you’re eventually going to major in a study, you’ll have the opportunity to deliberately take classes with certain students within your major. Instead of finding yourself lost and confused at midnight before an organic chemistry final, have your trusty study buddies by your side who can help you and vice a versa. Your peers are a great resource–so surround yourself with some study buddies you trust. 

3. Mark test dates clearly in your calendar
In high school, if you were sick, no problem–you could make the test up at a later date.  In college, this gets trickier.  It really depends on the professor and the course.  Never assume you’re going to be able to make-up an exam. Instead, you can usually find out early on what the exam schedule is, and if not, bug the teacher. If you have a conflict you can foresee early on, like a religious holiday, a wedding etc, talk to your teacher at the beginning of the semester. If you wait, it might look like you’re just trying to get some extra study days.  Most of all, you don’t want to miss an exam you don’t have a conflict with just because you didn’t realize when it was scheduled!

4. Give everybody a chance
This goes under the umbrella of “expanding your horizons” but we figured it was too important a part of the transition from high school to college to leave it off. In high school, you could probably walk into the cafeteria, point at each table and say which clique sat where. In college, you have the freedom to completely avoid the clique mentally. Part of this is not prejudging everybody you know. Give people the chance to prove themselves as a friend before you brush them off.  An open mind will turn college into a journey instead of closed off island.

Do you have any pieces of advice for transitioning from high school to college? Comment and share!