Posts Tagged ‘college choice’

10 Smallest Colleges in the U.S.

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We have been hearing a ton of feedback on the big school/small school debate, like these comments from Cappexians Emily and Audrey:

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The debate could go on forever about the pros and cons of a big school versus a small school, but in the end, it’s what floats your boat! If smaller classes, guaranteed attention from professors and faculty, and a close-knit community is something you’re looking for, how about starting off your college search with the 10 smallest colleges in the United States:

1. Shimer College
Enrollment – 81
Fun fact – Shimer college, now co-ed, was originally founded as an all female college. Its classes are exclusively small seminars–how could they be that big!– in which students discuss original source material rather than read textbooks

2. Sterling College
Enrollment –
99
Fun fact – Sterling College is one of seven colleges part of the Work College Consortium, which means it’s an institution of higher learning where student work is an integral and mandatory part of the educational process.

3. Lyme Academy College of Fine Arts
Enrollment –
128
Fun fact - The Lyme Academy is known for its contemporary focus on the history and tradition of representational art, centered on the study of nature and the figure. So if you want a contemporary focus on the history and tradition of representation art, centered on the study of nature and the figure…this might just be the place for you…just…maybe…

4. Bryn Athyn College
Enrollment - 155
Fun Fact - Bryn Aythn’s College’s original campus and surrounding community was designed in 1893 by Charles Eliot of the firm Olmstead, Olmstead, and Eliot – the famous firm responsible for the design of New York City’s Central Park.

5. Art Academy of Cincinnati
Enrollment –
156
Fun fact – Students at the Art Academy of Cincinnati work closely with faculty members who themselves are professional contemporary artists (student to faculty ratio is 10:1).

6. Burlington College
Enrollment - 166
Fun fact – Burlington College is one of the few American universities to offer study abroad programs in Havana, Cuba. So if you have an undying desire to relive your favorite movie “Dirty Dancing: Havana Nights,” this might be the easiest way to get the clearance to go to Cuba.

7. College of Visual Arts
Enrollment –
189
Fun fact – The College of Visual Arts is comprised of 5 school buildings including a 1915 mansion.

8. Montserrat College of Art
Enrollment –
270
Fun fact – Well-known alumni of Montserrat include prominent fashion designer Sigrid Olsen, sculptor Carlos Dorrien, and children’s book illustrator Giles Laroche.

9. Cogswell Polytechnical College
Enrollment –
287
Fun fact – Among Cogwell’s other programs are animation and video game development.

10. Judson College
Enrollment –
324
Fun fact – Judson is one of the oldest women’s colleges in the United States, but is now co-educational.

What’s your take? Do these schools sound too small or are they just the right size? Leave a comment!

Your Summer College Application To-Do List

Categories: Admissions Advice

Cappex SunIt’s June already, which means the school year’s over already, or you’ve got just a couple more days or weeks left.  Juniors, in a few months you will officially be seniors and knee deep in the college application process.

Right now you’re in the eye of the storm–so things look nice and dandy with blue skies and beach weather–but, the whirlwind of college essays, 20-page applications, teacher recommendations, ACT and SAT scores will hit you full on come September.

To keep you on track and help ease the unrelenting storm that is the college application season that brews in the fall, we’ve put together a simple to-do list for you:

JUNE
–Finish your school year off strong
–Register for the October SAT if haven’t taken it or want to try again
–Choose which colleges you want to visit during the summer
–Use the easy Campus Visit Planner to help organize trips
–Request information and application materials from colleges
–Schedule an interview for when you plan to visit campus

JULY
Review applications so you know what you’ll need
–Visit college campuses, take tours and interviews
–Narrow down list of colleges you will apply to
Start rough drafts for college essays
–Register for September ACT if haven’t take it or want to try again

AUGUST
–Contact friends, or friends of friends, at the colleges you’re interested in to ask questions
–Create a organization system to keep track of the colleges you’re applying to and the materials that correspond
–Keep working on college essays
–Have in mind a couple teachers you would like to ask for recommendations

If you keep up with these things, you won’t be as stressed when you head back to high school as a senior.

Do you have any steps we should add to the list? Comment and let us know!

Making Your College Decision Part 1: Set Clear College Priorities

Categories: Admissions Advice

collegeboundWe’ve already told you how to deal with waiting to hear from the colleges you’ve applied to, but soon, you’ll actually have to make your college decision.  If you’re accepted to two of the three schools you applied to, which one will you choose?

At Cappex, we’re very familiar with the college search and decision process. We have some great tips we’d love to share with you on how to make your college decision so you can avoid resorting to “eenie meenie miny moe” to make your decision. In this post, we’ll talk about part 1: setting clear college priorities.  This pretty much means firmly understanding what you want out of your college experience.  If “college experience” is too vague a term, we’ll help break it down with these words of wisdom from the Cappex College Priorities Worksheet:

1. Location
The actual location of your college or university is a major factor.   If plane flights were free and time travel existed, a lot more of us would probably be studying way further from home.  So the question comes to down to where you would like to live for four years? How far from home are you comfortable being?

2. Academics
Do you know what you want to study in college?  Of the schools you were accepted to, which one has the better program for what you want to do?  Does one school have bigger classes than the other?  What type of environment do you want to learn in?

3. Campus
What are the major differences between the college campuses you’re choosing between? How long does it take to walk from the dorms to the union? Where are classes held? Is it urban or rural? Small differences in one college’s campus over the other might help you make your college decision.

4. Social Life
Some schools are more academic or more social than others, so you’ll want to find the perfect balance for you. A social life can involve parties, sports, arts, Greek life, whatever you’d want yours to revolve around.

Making the college decision is not an easy one. And if you really want help making your choice, try this worksheet.